In 1959, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi embarked on a global quest to revive the practice of a simple meditation technique known as Transcendental Meditation®, with the goal of helping people achieve lives free of stress and infused with inner peace. Since then, millions of people, in over 50 countries, have learned Transcendental Meditation. The importance... of turning inward and relieving stress is now widely accepted around the world due to Maharishi's efforts. As part of his revival of this ancient wisdom, Maharishi introduced Ayurveda to the western world. In Sanskrit, Ayurveda literally translated means "the science of life." In honor of him, our company is named Maharishi Ayurveda. Maharishi means "great seer" in Sanskrit, and it is appropriate that the revival of this ancient knowledge is prefaced this way. Maharishi was unyielding when it came to the authenticity of these ancient formulations and their purity. In the early days of Maharishi Ayurveda, Maharishi, surrounded by the greatest Ayurvedic experts in India, rejected formulas due to minor deviations from the ancient original texts or due to lack of purity in the formula. This is the foundation of vpk® by Maharishi Ayurveda: Authentic, Pure, Effective and Safe. For more information on our Founder and the Transcendental Meditation technique, please visit http://www.tm.org. - See more at: http://www.mapi.com/our-story/our-story.html#gsc.tab=0 More

Summer Pasta with Cream Sauce

creamy-zucchini-pasta-with-parmesan-and-basil-top-of-a-grey-table-picture-id855292240 Summer Pasta with Cream Sauce

This is a recipe to help keep the summer heat from getting to you. It's fast and delicious. And it's lighter than you might think. Remember to use organic ingredients whenever possible.

Also remember that Pitta season runs from July to October. As soon as the first heat waves of summer roll around, most of us feel the effects of the increased Pitta in the atmosphere — perhaps a shorter fuse than usual, maybe more irritability and frustration, occasionally outbursts of anger. Whether you are predominantly Pitta by constitution or not, take measures to keep the fire element in balance during the heat of the summer.

Continue reading
0

Ginger Cannellini Bruschetta

bruchetta Ginger Cannellini Bruschetta

Summertime means lots of gatherings with family and friends sharing good food and drinks. Whether it's a pool party, block party or just because party, a weekend free is always an opportunity to play hostess.  Chips and charred salsa is always a good fall-back plan but having a a few new ideas in your back pocket can create a new experience. 

This is a great quick recipe for an appetizer to a larger meal. It is substantial and piquant. Serve at a group gathering along with crudités and your other favorite hors d'oeuvres.

Makes approximately 16

Ingredients

  • 4 Tbsp. garlic ghee
  • 2 tomatoes
  • Approx. 2 cups (16 oz.) small white beans (cannellini), soaked and cooked until tender
  • ⅛ cup olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp. balsamic vinegar
  • 3 Tbsp. ginger preserve
  • 1 tsp. dried dill weed
  • 1 tsp. coarse salt
  • ½ tsp. fresh ground pepper
  • 1 very fresh baguette, cut lengthwise and in 3-inch slices (approximately 16 slices)
Continue reading
1

5 Benefits of Turmeric, Ayurveda’s Golden Botanical

fresh-and-dried-turmeric-roots-in-a-wooden-bowl-picture-id690557976 5 Benefits of Turmeric, Ayurveda’s Golden Botanical

Turmeric (a.k.a. Indian Saffron) is a relative newcomer to American spice racks, but it’s been a mainstay in Indian cooking—and medicine—for thousands of years. The twisty root that gives your bowl of curry its bright, yellow color and distinctive flavor also holds a place of honor in traditional Ayurvedic medicine.

 

Continue reading
2

Zucchini Bread (Ayurveda Recipe)

Zucchini Bread Zucchini Bread

"Vegetables are a must on a diet. I suggest carrot cake, zucchini bread, and pumpkin pie."  - Jim Davis

Summer squash typically called "zucchini" were developed in northern Italy in the second half of the 19th century. Zucchini is one of the easiest vegetables to grow in a backyard garden and can produce a copious amount. Zucchini has a delicate flavor and requires little more than quick cooking with butter or olive oil, with or without fresh herbs.

zucchini BreadThis recipe uses grated zucchini to make a moist and delicious sweet bread. Enjoy!

Continue reading
2

Ayurvedic Walnut Veggie BrainBurgers

brainburger Ayurvedic Walnut Veggie BrainBurgers -Chef Domnick Mason

The English walnut has a rich, expansive history and the respect of modern science. Here's a veggie burger featuring the walnut from Chef Domnick Mason at the Raj Ayurvedic resort and spa in Fairfield Iowa. The Raj, for the last 25 years has provided a full range of authentic panchakarma treatments to clientele worldwide as well as meals for guests and the community that feature organic foods - much of it local.

This is the recipe for the famous Raj veggie-burger featuring the brain-nourishing, health-supporting walnut. Nuts are considered an important part of the vegetarian diet as they supply fiber, minerals, and vitamins. They contain beneficial phytochemicals. Some contain many different forms of plant sterols, which are believed to help moderate blood cholesterol. Some of the volatile oils in nuts contain antioxidants that help counter free radical damage. Tree nuts like almonds, walnuts and pecans contain no cholesterol. Most of the calories in nuts come from fat, but mainly unsaturated fat, and fat performs some essential functions in the body. A growing body of scientific research spotlights the health benefits of this delicious nut.

Continue reading
3

Seasonal Veggie Quinoa Salad with Pitta Churna Dressing

seasonal-veggie-quinoa-salad Seasonal Veggie Quinoa Salad with Pitta Churna Dressing
Fresh foods contain "prana," or life-giving energy, and are as close to nature as possible.

Prana is the vital energy present in fresh vegetables and fruits and pure air that we breathe. One of the reasons for eating is to imbibe prana, so you want to choose foods that are high in prana. The more you eat of life-giving foods, the more health and longevity you are likely to enjoy. Ayurveda considers food very powerful medicine. Make the best use of the foods you prepare and eat by choosing fresh, organic, filled-with-prana foods! 

Incorporating more fresh vegetables and fruits in your diet will give you an immediate energy boost. It's also important to cut the vegetables and cook them fresh at every meal. Buying pre-cut vegetables means that you have already lost some of the prana. For that reason, buy vegetables and fruits whole for maximum vitality.

Continue reading
0

Ayurvedic Fried Plantains (Bananas)

plaintains Ayurvedic Fried Plantains (Bananas)

Plantains are a delicious fruit belonging to the genus Musa, which includes the banana. There is no formal botanical distinction between plantains and bananas. Plantains are often eaten cooked. The plantain (banana) is indigenous to tropical Southeast Asia — including Indonesia, Malaysia, Brunei and the Philippines — and Northern Australia.

In ayurvedic terms, plantains have an astringent taste. People who need to balance Pitta and Kapha generally need to eat more bitter and astringent foods. Raw plantains and bananas can be harder to digest and, when eaten uncooked, are cold in nature, so cooking is an ideal way to prepare this fruit. In ayurveda, the banana is thought of as nature’s personal fountain of youth. It is known for stimulating healthy digestion and helps the body retain essential elements such as calcium, potassium, and phosphorus. Enjoy!

Continue reading
2

Stress and Immunity: The Microbiome Connection

Smilingscouple Stress and Immunity: The Microbiome Connection

Life has its ups and downs, and stress is a natural part of human existence. These days, though, American stress levels are at a record high, according to the American Psychological Association. We discussed the stress-microbiome connection with Robert Keith Wallace, Ph.D., who—along with his wife and co-author Samantha Wallace—wrote Gut Crisis: How Diet, Probiotics, and Friendly Bacteria Help You Lose Weight and Heal Your Body and Mind.

Dr. Wallace is a pioneering researcher on the physiology of consciousness and the mind/body connection as applied to behavioral medicine. His seminal research on higher states of consciousness has been published in Science, The American Journal of Physiology, and Scientific American. He’s currently Chair of the Department of Physiology and Health at Maharishi University of Management, of which he was a founding President.

Continue reading
3

Healing Greens 101: An Ayurvedic Perspective

Healing Greens 101: An Ayurvedic Perspective

No longer just a frilly garnish, kale is taking the culinary world by storm. Along with it, leafy greens like spinach, chard, and even collards and turnip greens are gracing plates everywhere from fine dining hotspots to fast food restaurants across the country.

These nutrient-packed veggies have long played a starring role in Ayurvedic cooking, and with good reason. They’re hydrating, nutrient-rich, and when prepared while fresh, they contain prana, or life-supporting energy. Below, we’ll share both Ayurvedic and nutritional insights on leafy greens, along with tasty ways to incorporate them into your daily diet.

Greens Are Good for You

From a nutritional perspective, leafy greens are excellent sources of antioxidant vitamins A and C, and they also provide vitamin E, folic acid, vitamin K, iron, calcium, magnesium, and fiber. They’re low in calories, and many varieties—especially the cruciferous (cabbage) family—contain unique enzymes that have been associated with supporting the immune system.

Ayurvedic vaidyas (experts) regularly prescribe a daily dose of leafy greens, because they’re good for your skin, hair, and for removing amavisha (toxic wastes) from the body. The human body is about 60 percent water, and leafy greens help purify your shrotas (the subtle channels of the body) and replenish your inner hydration stores.

Continue reading
2

Apple Crisp (Video)

apple crisp

Apple Crisp is simple to prepare, easy to digest, and when served warm in the cold winter season is Vata-pacifying. Stewed fruit is always a favorite of ayurveda! 

Vata governs all movement in the mind and body. It controls blood flow, elimination of wastes, breathing and the movement of thoughts across the mind.

Since Pitta and Kapha cannot move without it, Vata is considered the leader of the three Ayurvedic Principles in the body. It's very important to keep Vata in good balance.

Recipe and video from from Heaven's Banquet, Vegetarian Cooking for Lifelong Health the Ayurveda Way

by Miriam Kasin Hospodar

Continue reading
1

12 Ways to Avoid Nighttime Worry

12 Ways to Avoid Nighttime Worry

Do you find yourself tossing and turning at night, thoughts and worries from the day running through your mind like a movie reel? Worry and trouble falling asleep tend to go hand in hand, as both have their roots in Vata dosha. Vata governs movement in the mind and body. It controls your blood flow, your elimination, the rise and fall of your breath, and the movement of your thoughts and emotions. If Vata has fallen out of balance, which is easy in Vata season (late fall and winter), you might notice an increase in anxious feelings and difficulty sleeping.

Fortunately, with a few simple diet and lifestyle changes, you can improve the quality of your sleep. Rather than treating symptoms, Ayurveda offers a holistic approach to address the root cause of worry and trouble falling asleep. Try a few of these tips for a better night’s sleep.

Continue reading
3

Host an Ayurvedic Brunch with Friends

brunch

Nothing beats a lazy Sunday brunch—a welcome antidote to the hectic work week. Any brunch worth its salt tends to feature the following ingredients: hearty fare, a mix of sweet and savory tastes, and good conversation with loved ones. But if you find you often feel heavy after those waffles with a side of Eggs-Benny, you might want to consider hosting your own Ayurvedic brunch next week.

Here are some delicious, dosha-balancing brunch options to fill you and your guests up without weighing you down. Word to the wise: agni, your digestive fire, is strongest around noon, so try to rally your friends to show up around 11.


The Menu

  • Apple Pancakes: Made with a crepe batter, these pancakes are softer and more moist than regular ones. They’re also sweeter because of the apples, so they don’t require any topping.
  • Scrambled Tofu or Panir: This Heaven’s Banquet recipe from Miriam Kasin Hospodar is Vata-balancing, quick to make, and a great substitute for scrambled eggs.
  • Cranberry Muffins: Packed with vitamin C, these muffins taste great with nut butter.
  • Raja’s Cup Latte: A delicious, grounding, antioxidant-rich alternative to coffee.

And, if brunch turns into an afternoon visit...
  • Golden Milk: A warm, frothy drink that’s rich in turmeric, which helps purify the blood and promotes healthy circulation, lung function, and immunity. Note: it’s best to drink Golden Milk at least an hour away from meals to avoid slowing the digestion.

The Recipes

Apple Pancakes

Apple Pancakes

Continue reading
2

Split Moong Dhal

Split Moong Dhal
This is a basic mung bean dhal, meant to be a simple everyday Indian meal with rice and chapati, or a side dish as part of a larger meal. The wonderful buttery flavor is obtained from the technique called tarka, which means spices sizzled in ghee, added to the pot at the end of the cooking process.Ingredients½ cup split moong dhal2 cups water½ teaspoon salt¼ carrot, cut into thin slices½ teaspoon fresh ginger root, grated1 teaspoon MAPI Organic Vata Churna1 tablespoon ghee1 teaspoon fresh cilantro leaves½ teaspoon fresh lemon juiceDirectionsRinse dhal in cool water 3 times. Place water, carrots, and dhal in a medium-sized pot and bring to a boil.Skim off the foam that forms on the top of the boiling water with a tablespoon and discard.Lower heat and continue to simmer for 20 minutes, till the dhal is tender. If you want a thicker dhal, you can continue boiling for 5 minutes longer. Add the salt.In a separate saucepan melt the ghee. Add the fresh ginger root and sauté for several minutes.Add the Organic Vata Churna and sauté briefly, about 30 seconds, with the ginger root, making sure that the spices do not burn.Add spice mixture to dhal. The dhal may splash when you add the hot oil to it. Add the fresh cilantro and lemon juice.Stir and serve over rice or as a side soup with your main meal.Cooking an Ayurvedic Meal at Home
4

Self-Care Guide: Blissful Sleep (plus 10 ways to get you to your ZZZs)

Ayurvedic-Wellness-Blissful-Sleep

A Good Night’s Sleep


Millions of Americans of all ages are affected by sleep problems — many with severe, chronic sleep deprivation. A round-the-clock, activity-driven society has meant that many individuals habitually defer sleep to get other things done. "I'll catch up later" is, however, easier said than done. Recent research indicates that pervasive sleep deprivation can lead to more serious health problems than just a dull, clouded feeling the next morning — including obesity, high blood pressure and diminished resistance to infections. While there is substantial awareness about the need for proper nutrition and exercise, many people tend to shrug off lack of sleep as not being of much consequence, and, as a result, go through life with both mind and body always performing at less than optimal levels.


The Ayurvedic Perspective

According to The Council of Maharishi Ayurveda Physicians, sleep is one of the supporting pillars of life. Along with diet, sleep is critical to good health and well-being. Quality sleep acts as a rejuvenator of mind and body, enabling us to function at peak levels during our waking hours. Even powerful medicine is of little use if the fundamental pillars of life are not strong and solid.


Sleep is important because it enhances ojas — considered in ayurveda to be the master coordinator between mind, body and the inner self. Ojas is the finest product of digestion, the main life-supporting force within the body. It acts like a shock absorber, helping to insulate the mind from day-to-day stress and enhancing the body’s innate immune systems.

Continue reading
4

Prime Juice #1- reduce your anxiety

Prime Juice #1

Use Prime Juice #1 when feelings of anxiety arise, or when you feel ungrounded, sluggish, or unmotivated. This juice is also good for fall, winter, and spring, or whenever the weather is cooler. Prime Juice contains pure and absorbable nutrition, and can help minimize detoxification symptoms.

Ingredients

  • 1 cucumber
  • 1 apple, seeds removed
  • 1 handful fresh spinach
  • ¼ head purple cabbage
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 beet
  • 1 lemon (you can use the entire lemon, but cut it into quarters before juicing)
  • 1 inch peeled fresh ginger

Optional: ½ to 1 teaspoon spirulina powder, stirred into the juice after preparing. The taste is strong, so if you want to try it, start on the low side and work up to a full teaspoon.

Continue reading
1

7 Easy Ways to Recharge Your Gut in 2018

7 Easy Ways to Recharge Your Gut in 2018

With all the glorious excesses of the holidays behind us—pastries, parties, and New Year’s Eve celebrations, oh my—you might be feeling a bit worn out. Fatigue, brain fog, and a few extra pounds around your middle are all signs that your digestive system could use a little tune-up. No time for a big cleanse? No worries. We’ve got your back—and some easy, age-old Ayurvedic tips to gently purify and strengthen your digestion.

Here are seven of our favorite (and simple!) strategies for restoring and maintaining gut health in 2018:

Continue reading
3

Spanakopita (Spinach Pie)

Spanakopita-Spinach-Pie
This savory Greek pie traditionally comes in the shape of a small triangle, and it is a truly attractive, delicious, and welcome addition to any meal. Spanakopita is one of the best finger foods you can serve for just about any occasion. 


In What is Spanakopita?wiseGEEK provides an overview of spanakopita through the ages: “This tasty dish may have originated over 400 years ago, and may have been introduced during the Turkish occupation of Greece. A Turkish dish, ispanaki, is almost identical in presentation, though it sometimes has scallions added. Spanakopita is better known as a Greek food, however, and one will find it served in most Greek restaurants outside of Greece, as well as in virtually all restaurants in Greece. Chefs and food historians credit Epirus, Greece with the most delicious spanakopita.
Continue reading
1

Stress-Free Holiday Travel: Traveling Tips From Maharishi Ayurveda

holiday travel

Long delays and canceled flights...traffic jams...inclement weather...crowds.....all these factors and more can make traveling during the holiday season a nightmare for many people. Yet, getting together with friends and family is a big part of what makes the season so special.

It's possible to travel stress-free. Once you understand what imbalances are caused by travel, you can take steps to protect yourself and prevent the imbalances from developing.

Continue reading
3

Healthy Holiday Treats

Healthy Holiday Treats

The mouthwatering aromas of cinnamon and nutmeg waft through homes everywhere as chefs lovingly recreate traditional holiday favorites such as pumpkin pie and gingerbread. Nothing conjures up the holiday spirit more than festive meals eaten in the company of family and friends.

Eating in the pleasant company of friends and family is wonderful for health. According to ayurveda, the spiritual components of cooking and eating are just as important for digestion and assimilation as are the physical components. That means, for example, cooking in a joyous rather than a stressed atmosphere, giving positive attention to the process of cooking and serving the meal, saying thanks before you begin, and enjoying companionable silence or quiet, pleasant conversation with friends and family as you eat. Such a meal converts quickly to ojas, the substance that sustains life and promotes good health, radiance and bliss.

Continue reading
2

Cauliflower with Pistachios

Cauliflower with Pistachios

Cauliflower is one of the most delectable, beneficial and versatile foods there is. From its sumptuous aroma and indescribably nuanced flavors (slightly nutty, a bit floral, but not at all overwhelming), to the luscious way it practically melts on the tongue when cooked to perfection, cauliflower is a powerhouse of deliciousness and nutrition, and there are countless ways to add it into daily dining.

For this recipe, we've joined cauliflower with pistachios for a truly unique and ambrosial taste experience. The dry, almost "earthy" flavor of pistachios intermingles beautifully with the nutty/floral overtones of the cauliflower for an enticing and extremely healthful dish. Enjoy!

Continue reading
3