In 1959, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi embarked on a global quest to revive the practice of a simple meditation technique known as Transcendental Meditation®, with the goal of helping people achieve lives free of stress and infused with inner peace. Since then, millions of people, in over 50 countries, have learned Transcendental Meditation. The importance of turning inward and relieving stress is now widely accepted around the world due to Maharishi's efforts.


As part of his revival of this ancient wisdom, Maharishi introduced Ayurveda to the western world. In Sanskrit, Ayurveda literally translated means "the science of life." In honor of him, our company is named Maharishi Ayurveda. Maharishi means "great seer" in Sanskrit, and it is appropriate that the revival of this ancient knowledge is prefaced this way.


Maharishi was unyielding when it came to the authenticity of these ancient formulations and their purity. In the early days of Maharishi Ayurveda, Maharishi, surrounded by the greatest Ayurvedic experts in India, rejected formulas due to minor deviations from the ancient original texts or due to lack of purity in the formula. This is the foundation of vpk® by Maharishi Ayurveda: Authentic, Pure, Effective and Safe.


For more information on our Founder and the Transcendental Meditation technique, please visit http://www.tm.org.


- See more at: http://www.mapi.com/our-story/our-story.html#gsc.tab=0
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Vata-Pitta Balancing Soup

Vata-Pitta Balancing Soup

Moong dhal is rich in protein and a staple food in India. This healthy Indian comfort food is prepared from yellow split lentil (green split gram without skin) and a main source of protein for vegetarians.  


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Balance Restlessness

Balance Restlessness

If you have ever experienced restless sensations or twitching in your body, arms or legs when you are relaxing, sitting down for meditation, or sleeping — you are not alone. Restlessness in the physiology is a common experience for many.

Ayurveda identifies this imbalance as related to Vata dosha — specifically Apana Vata, a subdosha of Vata that governs downward flow in the body. The movement associated with Vata is fast; it is the dosha that governs movement, after all. But with Vata imbalance, symptoms can be expressed as restlessness in the body, arms or legs. Ayurveda focuses on digestion as the primary source of balance and good health. When digestion is not strong due to weak agni (digestive fire), or environmental stress, our bodies can build up accumulated impurities or toxins, known as ama. These impurities lead to our doshas going out of balance, and Vata, being responsible for movement, will usually be the first to be affected. The result, in Vata-dominant people, can experience spaciness, occasional constipation, feeling cold in a temperate environment, worry and, for purposes of this article, restless limbs.

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Ayurvedic Strategies for Healthy Holiday Eating

Ayurvedic Strategies for Healthy Holiday Eating

‘Tis the season to be snacking! From Thanksgiving (or even Halloween) through Valentine’s Day, the holidays present an extended string of festive gatherings that center around food and drinks. While living it up with friends, family, and colleagues can be fun, it can also be a bit stressful—especially if travel, hectic schedules, extra spending, and rich, sugary foods are on the menu.

“When there’s stress involved, our choices can become more reactive, rather than coming from a grounded place and connected to the self,” says Sankari Wegman, an Ayurvedic consultant at The Raj who also teaches Ayurvedic cooking classes. Moreover, Wegman tells us, it’s particularly easy to feel stressed during Vata season, which falls in autumn. “Vata by nature is light and airy, and it gets thrown out of balance when there’s any kind of irregularity.”

Below, Wegman offers ten easy Ayurvedic lifestyle and diet tips to help combat holiday stress—whether you’re the host, the chef, or dining solo this season.

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5 Time-Saving Hacks for Ayurvedic Meal-Planning

5 Time-Saving Hacks for Ayurvedic Meal-Planning



Life can get hectic, especially in autumn — a time of new school assignments, demanding projects at work, and the beginning of the holiday season. When your schedule is slammed, it can be hard to find time to prepare healthy, balanced Ayurvedic meals. Ironically, this is likely when you need them most! Delicious, well-spiced, cooked meals help to balance the doshas and create harmony in your mind and body.

While you can’t always prepare a full, Ayurvedic spread, there are some helpful, time-saving hacks that can help you — and your family — to eat well on the go. We’ve shared a few tips below, drawing inspiration from Ayurvedic chef, writer, and artist Miriam Kasin Hospodar, author of Heaven’s Banquet: The Maharishi Ayurveda Cookbook.

1. Bake Your Breakfast

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Fine Fall (and winter) Meals: Ayurvedic Soups

Fine Fall (and winter) Meals: Ayurvedic Soups

Nothing warms and nourishes quite like a hot bowl of delicious soup on a cold fall day. Ayurveda loves soups. They are easy to make, they are nutritious and easy to digest, and they are perfect for the light evening meal recommended by ayurvedic experts (vaidyas). Because they are so easy to digest, soups are ideal for children. Made with fresh organic fall vegetables, grains, pasta, beans, dhals, herbs and traditional ayurvedic spices, soups make great ayurvedic dietary anchors. Enjoy your soup with freshly-made chapatis (flatbreads) on the side, and it will be a meal you’ll want to return to.

Soups are also fast. You can have a finished soup ready to serve in 30 minutes. Here are a couple of easy ayurvedic soup recipes. Remember, whenever possible, favor fresh, organic and non-GMO foods.

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Fall Pick-Me-Ups for Vata Dosha

Fall Pick-Me-Ups for Vata Dosha

Come October, change is in the air. Leaves turn color and fall. The air feels cool — and dry. Inside your body, Vata dosha, the dosha of the season, tends to increase, often commanding Pitta and Kapha doshas to play second, and third, fiddle. This is how it is likely to be till February, when the season both outside and within you will change once again.

When Vata dosha takes over for these few months, its restless, sweeping quality can throw your physiology — and psychology — completely out of balance. Constipation, dry skin, irregular appetite, lack of sleep, stress, fatigue — an out-of-sync Vata can cause all of these problems and more.

But in nature's scheme of things, the Vata environment outside is supposed to synchronize perfectly smoothly with changes within our bodies and minds. If, that is, we stay in tune with some simple rhythms of nature.

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Barley Sauté

Barley Sauté
Barley is a wonderfully versatile cereal grain with a rich nutlike flavor and an appealing chewy, pasta-like consistency. Its appearance resembles wheat berries, although it is slightly lighter in color. Sprouted barley is naturally high in maltose, a sugar that serves as the basis for both malt syrup sweetener. When fermented, barley is used as an ingredient in beer and other alcoholic beverages. As the weather begins to turn cold, a big pot of soup simmering on the stove warms the heart as well as the hearth. Adding some whole grain barley to the pot will improve your health along with the flavor of whatever soup or stew you're cooking. In addition to its robust flavor, barley's claim to nutritional fame is based on its being a very good source of molybdenum, manganese, dietary fiber, and selenium, and a good source of copper, vitamin B1, chromium, phosphorus, magnesium, and niacin.In this recipe, barley is sautéed similar to what you would do with rice. The added herbs and spices makes this a great dish on its own or serve with with a salad. Enjoy!Barley SautéIngredients1 cup barley2 cups water1 teaspoon fresh ginger, minced1 teaspoon fresh parsley, minced2 teaspoons fresh basil, minced2 tablespoons red bell pepper in small slices½ teaspoon turmeric½ teaspoon mustard seeds½ teaspoon fenugreek seeds½ teaspoon cumin seeds1 tablespoon olive oilDirectionsBring water to a boil. Add barley and reduce to low heat.Cover and cook for 40 minutes or until water is cooked out.In a separate frying pan, heat olive oil.Add mustard seeds; when they begin to pop add cumin and fenugreek and cook for about one minute.Then add fresh ginger, turmeric and red pepper.After 3 minutes add the cooked barley. Cook for several minutes and garnish with parsley and basil.Add salt to taste.

Grains — Vegetarian Powerhouses

 DisclaimerThe sole purpose of these articles is to provide information about the tradition of ayurveda. This information is not intended for use in the diagnosis, treatment, cure or prevention of any disease. If you have any serious acute or chronic health concern, please consult a trained health professional who can fully assess your needs and address them effectively. If you are seeking the medical advice of a trained ayurvedic expert, call or e-mail us for the number of a physician in your area. Check with your doctor before taking herbs or using essential oils when pregnant or nursing.

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Boost Your Mind & Memory this Fall: 7 Ayurvedic Tips

Boost Your Mind & Memory this Fall: 7 Ayurvedic Tips

Autumn’s has arrived, and while that marks the end of summer, it’s also a time for exciting new beginnings. This September, you might be starting a new school year, a new career or project, or possibly even exploring post-retirement pursuits after decades in the workforce. Whatever new mental challenges lie ahead of you, Ayurveda can help you stay sharp, clear, and focused. Here are 7 Ayurvedic tips for boosting your mind and memory this fall.


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Ayurvedic Garbanzo Bean Party Dip

Ayurvedic Garbanzo Bean Party Dip

The chickpea (Cicer arietinum) is a legume. The seeds of this ancient plant — the chickpea — are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes — 7,500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East.

Other common names for the species include garbanzo bean, ceci bean, sanagalu, chana, hummus and Bengal gram.

This slightly-tart, slightly-sweet dip is perfect for a party. It can also be used as a stuffing for quesadillas or as a pesto-type sauce.

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Your Best Foot Forward: Ayurvedic Foot Care

Your Best Foot Forward: Ayurvedic Foot Care

If there is one part of your body that works hard for you, it is your feet. Every day, walking and other activities bring the weight of your entire body to bear on your feet. And that workload may come with a cost — your feet are the area of your body most subject to injury.

Yet most of us pay little attention to our feet, unless of course there is an injury or imbalance. Here are a few tips to give your soles some love and avoid hot, tired, overworked feet.

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3

Three Cooling Summer Smoothie Recipes

Green-Smoothie
Rose Smoothie
Date Smoothie
Green Smoothie

Feeling the heat this summer? When the sun’s rays are stronger outside, you might notice fiery Pitta dosha heating up in your own body. Signs of healthy Pitta on the move include higher energy levels, feelings of optimism, and an overall brightening within. But if Pitta dosha gets overheated, you may start to feel a little irritable and frustrated, or even experience rashes, acne, and other skin disruptions. Fortunately, Pitta can easily be brought back into balance with a little cooling and sweetness.

For a fast and easy way to give Pitta dosha some TLC, try these three cooling summer smoothie recipes, below. Each recipe calls for Pitta-pacifying ingredients and is chock-full of vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, and healthy fiber. You may notice we’ve left out some smoothie-ingredient standards — like yogurt and banana — which can aggravate Pitta. We’re pretty sure you’ll love these sweet, creamy recipes just the same!

1) Fresh and Fruity Sweet Berry Rose Smoothie

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Six Tips to Fight Stress with Ayurveda

Six Tips to Fight Stress with Ayurveda

"Brain cells create ideas. Stress kills brain cells. Stress is not a good idea," says a modern philosopher.

Whether our stress is caused from work, routine, or relationships, most of us, at some point in our lives, are faced with the uncomfortable symptoms of stress. These symptoms may manifest in a number of ways including worry, fatigue, increased anger, problems with relationships, inability to focus properly, stress headaches, trouble sleeping, and a variety of stress-related health issues.

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Dinacharya: A Routine to Align Our Natural Rhythm

Dinacharya: A Routine to Align Our Natural Rhythm

From an Ayurvedic perspective, following a dinacharya, or daily routine, aligns us with nature’s rhythms each day. There is new evidence that demonstrates that our genes may have, over time, lost their ability to hear the natural circadian rhythms of nature. Doctors are only now beginning to understand exactly how important it is for the body to stay in rhythm with nature. In our modern high-tech world, it is becoming a challenge to align our body with the laws of Nature. Our priorities have shifted from being existential to being very concerned with to-do lists, work schedules, finances, etc. Many times, we are so bent on our daily activities that we ignore our health and well-being in order to achieve what we believe is of utmost importance at that particular moment. With social media and cell phones giving us instant access to anyone in the world, these “distractions” may take us out of balance and we lose alignment with the rhythms of nature.

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New Year Resolutions - Food! "We are how we eat."

New Year Resolutions - Food! "We are how we eat."

The New Year brings new hopes, aspirations and resolutions. It is the time of the year when we set our goals to achieve for the next year. How many of us are able to actually act on our plans? Be it the promise to hit the gym every single day or make a schedule to socialize more often, even the best promise-keepers may find it hard to keep up with New Year’s resolutions. However, no matter how many times we’ve fallen behind, year after year, we never give up. And I say we shouldn’t! After all, the new year is all about starting new habits (good ones) and committing to the activities that lead to a more positive life — all leading in the direction of better health and happiness.

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Improving Mental Health with Ayurveda: The Meditation-Ayurveda Connection

Improving Mental Health with Ayurveda: The Meditation-Ayurveda Connection

Ayurveda is a 5,000-year-old system of natural medicine from India. According to the ancient Ayurvedic texts, one of the eight major branches of Ayurveda is Mental Health.

Starting in the early 1980’s, Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the Vedic scholar who made Transcendental Meditation® available worldwide and founded Maharishi Ayurveda, met with Ayurvedic scholars, doctors and scientists for the purpose of restoring this ancient system of medicine to its full dignity.

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Food, Mood and Digestion: The Mind-Body Connection

Food, Mood and Digestion: The Mind-Body Connection

Q: How does food affect our moods?

Vaidya Manohar: The food we eat has a significant influence on our minds and hearts. You could even say that the nature of our mind and feelings depends on the food we have eaten.

And conversely, the state of our mind, emotions, intellect and senses — and our overall state of contentment — all these, in turn, affect the digestion, absorption and elimination of the food we have eaten.

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5 Surprising Benefits of Abhyanga

5 Surprising Benefits of Abhyanga

It’s easy to understand the truth stated above; however, in our busy, modern-day lives, it can be a challenge to put these truths into practice. Oftentimes, for the person who tries to get it all done, every day, it can be a superhuman task, and prioritizing for ourselves is the last thing on our mind. We have to eat, so food must be shopped for and cooked; the kids have to be picked up, and they need help with homework and all their extracurricular activities; the house must be tidied, and the dog must be walked (for we know the consequences of making the poor thing wait too long); and then there’s that deadline at work…it is never-ending.

With the busyness of our day-to-day activities, how do we stop and make ourselves the center of our own lives again?

It starts with intention. You probably already have the intention, or at least the willingness to have intention, since you’re reading this. So let’s get started. Let’s cultivate the intention to prioritize our own well-being and start by giving our bodies some love with ayurvedic self-massage, known as abhyanga!

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Natural Relief from Everyday Tension

Natural Relief from Everyday Tension

Are you one of the many people that finds yourself coping with, trudging through, struggling to manage, or recovering from occasional feelings of anxiousness or worry? You are not alone in your plight. Many of us experience worry and tension at some point in our lives. For some, it is a daily occurrence. Who knows — maybe the wind blew wrong that day; for others, it comes with travel; and for some, it’s a school exam or deadline at work that causes us to worry.

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How to Stay Healthy While Traveling in India Using Maharishi Ayurveda

How to Stay Healthy While Traveling in India Using Maharishi Ayurveda

India is a place of wonder, a place of adventure and spiritual awakening. It is the ancient birthplace of ayurveda, and it is the source of the high-quality herbs used in vpk® by Maharishi Ayurveda formulas. Staying healthy as a Western tourist in India can be a challenge. I know this from traveling there seven times over the past eight years. The first three visits I contracted dysentery and was cooped up in bed for at least five days each time.

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Ayurvedic Patterns, Children, & Chronobiology

Ayurvedic Patterns, Children, & Chronobiology

Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, the founder of vpk® by Maharishi Ayurveda, stated that orderliness in our bodies connotes health, and disease is a symptom of disorder. Nature's pattern, once disturbed, can create disease.

The whole-health approach of ayurveda works with nature to reinstate order and intelligence in the body, because when health is disrupted, it means that our natural rhythms are off. Circadian rhythms are the rhythms of nature (cyclical, seasonal, lunar, annual, etc.) that attune our bodies to a 24-hour cycle, driven by the circadian clock. This cycle has been widely observed in plants, animals, fungi and throughout nature. Understanding our circadian rhythm can be especially important for keeping our children balanced, happy, and healthy. How so?

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30 Simple Ways to Create Balance and Connection

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